Posts Tagged ‘soup’

  1. butternut squash soup

    October 26, 2014 by Angie

    I saw a butternut squash in its pre-soup form for the first time this week. I asked Robbie to identify one and bring it home from the grocery store. He did a good job, picking out a nice, big one even though neither of us were sure what they look like.

    butternut squash

    On Friday, I turned it into soup. Preparing a butternut squash is not the most straight-forward thing, the first time. This site helped me. You’re going to need a serious knife and some elbow grease. Aside from that, this recipe is very easy and we both liked that it requires minimal cleanup. The soup was delicious, if I do say so myself.

    time to eat soup!

    Adapted from College Vegetarian Cooking by Megan and Jill Carle.

    Yields 4 meal-size servings or six side/appetizer servings.

    Ingredients

    1 stalk of celery
    1 medium yellow onion
    1-2 carrots
    2 large russet potatoes
    1 large butternut squash (2.5-3 lbs)
    1 quart of vegetable broth
    salt and pepper to taste

    Instructions

    1. Wash and peel (if applicable), the celery, yellow onion, carrot(s), and potatoes. Chop into smallish pieces and put them in a large stockpot to clear your cutting board for the next step.

    2. Wash and peel the butternut squash. I peeled later but it was pretty dangerous so if you can do it now, do it now. Cut the squash across the neck, then in halves. Scoop out the seeds and stringy stuff. Chop off and discard the ends. Chop the rest into smallish pieces and add them to the stock pot.

    3. Pour the vegetable broth into the stockpot and turn it on to get the broth boiling. Turn the heat down to medium-low (3 or 4) and cook for thirty minutes, stirring every once in a while.

    4. When the vegetables are tender and verging on mushy, turn off the heat. Use an immersion blender to puree the vegetables. Add salt and pepper to taste.

    5. Eat your delicious soup with some buttery toast.

    butternut squash soup


  2. Maria’s French onion soup

    June 14, 2014 by Angie

    I’ve been on a quest for really fantastic homemade vegetarian French onion soup. This slow cooker version I made a few weeks ago was pretty great but I thought I could do better. My friend’s mom, Maria, makes an amazingly delicious soup that I have been fortunate enough to eat. Here is my slightly altered rendition of Maria’s recipe. Let’s just say: Mission Accomplished.

    a bowl of French onion soup

    Makes 4-5 servings

    Ingredients

    1-2 tbs olive oil
    5 medium to large sweet onions, cut in thin rounds
    64 oz of vegetarian beef stock made by dissolving 3 tbs Vegetarian Better than Bouillon No Beef Base in 2 quarts of boiling water
    1/4 cup cooking sherry
    3/4-1 tsp thyme, to taste
    salt and pepper, to taste
    1 loaf of French bread
    1 oz of shredded Swiss cheese per serving (or Daiya shreds to make it vegan)

    Instructions

    1. Caramelize the onions. I used the slow cooker to do this so that I didn’t have to babysit. I put about a tablespoon of olive oil in the slow cooker, added the sliced onions, put the lid on, and cooked on low for about six and a half hours. My slow cooker cooks hot so other crocks may require eight hours of cooking. Stir every few hours, if you’re home.

    2. Boil two quarts of water in a large stock pot. Stir in 3 tbs of Vegetarian Better than Bouillon No Beef Base.

    3. Once the bouillon is dissolved, turn the burner down to low. Add the sherry, thyme, salt, and pepper. Transfer the caramelized onions to the stock pot. Let the soup simmer while you do the next steps.

    French onion soup

    Simmering French onion soup

    4. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Shred your cheese if you haven’t already.

    French bread in bowls

    Two servings of French onion soup coming right up!

    5. Cut slices of French bread about 3/4 inch thick. Place one or two pieces in the bottom of an oven-safe bowl for each serving.

    6. After the soup has simmered for 10-15 minutes, add seasoning to taste. Ladle the soup into each bowl and top with the shredded cheese. Move the bowls to the oven (on a baking sheet to avoid a mess) and bake until the cheese is bubbly and melted.

    just out of the oven

     Just out of the oven

    7. Pour some wine to drink with your ridiculously good French onion soup.

    yummy

    OMG French onion soup


  3. slow cooker French onion soup

    May 15, 2014 by Angie

    I love French onion soup but it’s usually made with beef (or chicken or both) stock. I have had excellent vegetarian French onion soup in the past, however, so I know it’s possible. The most heavenly soup of all time was eaten by us at Le Potager du Marais, a vegetarian restaurant in Paris, on our honeymoon.

    Le Potager du Marais

     At Le Potager du Marais. Mmm, I want to live in Paris and eat this everyday.

    The slow cooker version I made today is really good but I am open to trying different recipes and techniques in my quest to make the perfect French onion soup.

    slow cooker French onion soup

    Tonight’s dinner: slow cooker French onion soup

    Slightly adapted from Fresh from the Vegan Slow Cooker by Robin Robertson

    Ingredients

    about 2 tbsp olive oil
    4 medium yellow onions, sliced thinly
    5 cups of vegetable broth
    1/3 cup of red wine (I used Finca Copete Malbec/Tempranillo blend.)

    Finca Copete
    1 tsp vegan Worcestershire sauce
    1/2 tsp thyme
    a healthy sprinkle of garlic powder
    a healthy sprinkle of dried parsley
    1 bay leaf
    salt and pepper to taste
    a fresh loaf of French bread (Thank you, Publix Bakery!)
    shredded Gruyere or (vegan) cheese of your choice

    Directions

    1. Pour some olive oil in the bottom of your slow cooker and turn it to low while you thinly slice four or five onions. Add the onions to the slow cooker. Cook them for about eight hours, stirring occasionally if you’re home and have that luxury.

    2. When the eight hours have passed, the onions will be caramelized and delicious-smelling. Add the vegetable broth, red wine, vegan Worcestershire sauce, thyme, garlic powder, parsley, bay leaf, and some salt and pepper. Continue to cook on low for about 45 minutes.

    3. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Shred some Gruyere and cut enough 3/4 inch slices of bread to cover the tops of the soup for the number of servings you’re preparing. We each fit two in our bowls but could have done three if we were feeling ambitious/gluttonous.

    4. I baked the bread slices for a few minutes alone then took them out, placed the shredded Gruyere on top, and put them back in until the cheese was melted.

    5. Remove the bay leaf. Ladle the soup into bowls and top with cheesy bread slices and some extra shredded Gruyere. Add salt and pepper to taste.

    a bowl of soup


  4. red bean gumbo with field roast “sausage”

    April 24, 2014 by Angie

    Last night we had a small dinner party for Wine Wednesday. We pretty much call any Wednesday “Wine Wednesday” in our house these days. I tested a new recipe on our friends and it was well-received – everyone got seconds! I made this gumbo as authentic as I possibly could with two (kinda major) exceptions: 1) I didn’t start out with a roux because I made it in the slow cooker and 2) there’s no meat! However, it is made with Zatarain’s Filé Powder and Tabasco sauce and the chef was born in New Orleans so I think it’s pretty legit. This is adapted from Robin Robertson’s red bean gumbo from Fresh from the Vegan Slow Cookerwhich I understand to be an updated, totally vegan version of my favorite slow cooker cookbook that she published eight years earlier.

    red bean gumbo with field roast "sausage"

    Ingredients

    olive oil
    yellow onion, chopped
    4 celery ribs, chopped
    big spoonful of minced garlic
    1 quart vegetable broth
    2 cans of dark red kidney beans, rinsed and drained
    1 can of fire-roasted tomatoes, undrained
    1 green bell pepper, finely chopped
    3/4 cup okra, sliced
    2 bay leaves
    1 tsp dried thyme
    1 tsp file powder
    2 tsp paprika
    1 1/2 tsp dried oregano
    1/2 tsp garlic powder
    1/2 tsp onion powder
    a pinch of cayenne pepper
    5 drops of liquid smoke
    1/2 tsp Tabasco sauce
    salt and pepper to taste
    vegetable oil
    2 Field Roast Italian Sausages, sliced and browned
    cooked rice for serving (I cooked up 2 cups uncooked rice and that was enough to feed 4 people and cover the leftover gumbo.)

    Tabasco sauce and File powder

    Directions

    1. Chop the onion and celery. Heat olive oil in a pan. Sauté the onion for a few minutes then add the celery and garlic and cook a few minutes more.

    2. Transfer the vegetables to the slow cooker and set it to low.

    3. Pour the vegetable broth, fire-roasted tomatoes (with the juice), and the listed seasonings from bay leaves to cayenne pepper into the slow cooker. Stir and put the lid back on.

    4. Wash and chop the bell pepper and okra. Add them to the slow cooker.

    5. Drain and rinse the two cans of beans in a colander. Add them to the slow cooker. Stir everything together and cook on low for six hours.

    6. About thirty minutes prior to serving, make the rice according to the package directions. Keep the rice separate until it’s time to serve up the gumbo.

    7. About ten minutes prior to serving, heat some vegetable oil in a pan. Cut the two Field Roast “sausages” into thin slices. Add the liquid smoke and tabasco sauce to the slow cooker and stir. Brown the sausage slices on both sides then stir them into the slow cooker.

    8. Spoon some rice into the serving bowls. Discard the bay leaves then use a ladle to spoon gumbo over the rice in each bowl. Make sure to get enough broth and delicious sausage in every serving.


  5. stovetop black bean soup

    February 3, 2014 by Angie

    In our house, we eat black beans like it’s our job. Why not eat a can each in soup format for dinner? I found this recipe for Cuban Black Bean Soup from Dr. Fuhrman when somebody posted a link to his library of recipes on Facebook.

    stovetop black bean soup

    I used can beans and skipped the mashed cauliflower part because I wanted an easy recipe and, honestly, I’m not convinced mashed cauliflower belongs in the middle of my black bean soup. Aside from that omission, I followed his recipe exactly. Instead of the mashed cauliflower, I garnished the finished soup with slices of avocado, chopped green onion, and a sprinkle of reduced fat Mexican cheese. Yummy! We ate that entire pot between the two of us.


  6. loaded baked potato soup

    November 23, 2013 by Angie

    I saw this recipe for slow cooker loaded baked potato soup on reddit.com and I couldn’t wait to make it/eat it. I followed her directions exactly and even used some of the same toppings: sliced green onion and grated cheddar cheese. My slow cooker runs hot so I’m pretty sure mine was much more cooked than hers. It was very mushy at the end of the eight hours. I added some extra vegetable broth to try to get it to a soup consistency. That didn’t really work. Alas, it was the best tasting bowl of mashed potatoes I’ve ever made!

    Loaded Baked Potato Soup

    Here are the converted ingredient measurements for us ‘Muricans.

    5 medium potatoes
    2 cups of vegetable stock
    1 onion, diced
    4 cloves of garlic, minced
    about 2 ounces of cheddar cheese
    1 ounce of butter (I used Earth Balance margarine)
    salt, black pepper, and toppings of your choice to taste

    I got to use my snazzy immersion blender for this. I can’t believe people use real blenders to make soup! I barely had to use it though due to the overcooking. The onion, potatoes, and broth mixture had become a big mush on its own. The recipe tasted really great but I don’t think it could be called a soup – again this is probably due to my overactive crock pot. I really do think I will adapt this and make mashed potatoes this way in the future. It was a lot easier than the old fashioned way.


  7. tortilla soup

    April 2, 2013 by Angie

    For dinner last night I made tortilla soup for the first time. I used a recipe from The Vegan Slow Cooker by Kathy Hester to start and made some of my own changes and additions.

    tortilla soup

    Ingredients
    olive oil
    vegetable oil (my addition)
    1 medium-size yellow onion, minced
    2-3 tsp minced garlic
    1 box of Pomo Chopped Tomatoes (instead of crushed tomatoes)
    3 tbsp tomato paste
    1 can of El Ebro black beans, rinsed (my addition)
    4 cups low sodium vegetable broth (instead of the suggested water)
    juice of 1/2 lime
    1 tsp cumin
    1 tsp chili powder (increased from the original recipe)
    1/4 tsp garlic powder (my addition)
    salt and pepper to taste
    1/4 c tequila (optional, I included it though because why would you ever skip tequila?)
    (original calls for 1 tsp of agave nectar or maple syrup but I skipped this)
    1 package of West Soy Chicken-Style Seitan (1 lbs 2oz)
    fried corn tortilla strips (my addition)
    1 avocado
    handful of fresh cilantro, washed and chopped (original recipe says to add 2 tbsp fresh cilantro in the slow cooker but I only used it for garnish)

    Instructions
    1. Heat the olive oil in a pan and saute the onion and minced garlic until translucent.
    2. In the slow cooker, combine the onion and garlic, chopped tomatoes, tomato paste, black beans, vegetable stock, lime juice, cumin, chili powder, garlic powder, salt and pepper, and tequila. Cook on low for 6 hours. The original recipe says to puree the soup with a hand blender after six hours. I didn’t do this because there were no giant chunks in this soup and it’s not the kind of thing that will become creamy (like a potato soup) so I thought it would be better left whole.
    3. About half an hour before you’re ready to eat, brown the seitan in vegetable oil. Add the browned seitan to the slow cooker and turn it up to high.
    4. While the seitan is warming, fry corn tortillas in olive oil. Cut the fried tortillas into strips to use as a garnish.
    5. Slice the avocado into pretty wedges and wash and mince the fresh cilantro.
    6. Serve the soup into bowls and top with avocado wedges, fried tortilla strips, and cilantro.

    Verdict: This soup is soooo good! Robbie and I have only ever had tortilla soup at Mellow Mushroom because it seems to have chicken in it everywhere else. Their vegetarian version is pretty awesome but Robbie said he liked mine better 🙂 I will definitely make it again – probably soon before my second container of seitan expires. If you decide to make it I strongly suggest going all out with the garnishes. It takes some time but the fried tortilla strips and avocado wedges are what make this soup so special.


  8. potato leek soup

    March 1, 2013 by Angie

    Our new puppy has been keeping me really busy. I’ve been doing a fair amount of cooking at the new house but sticking to old favorites I know I can make quickly. Last night I branched out and made potato leek soup for the first time.

    Potato Leek Soup

    I used this recipe from the Vegetarian Times. It was my first time using leeks so I was glad the Internet is full of cooking websites happy to instruct me in the proper cleaning and cutting of leeks.

    Robbie and I really liked this rich, creamy soup. It wasn’t difficult to make so I would definitely make it again. I used nearly three medium potatoes, skipped the lemon, added some ground pepper, and ended up using about 3 3/4 cups of vegetable broth total. I continue to be a huge proponent of the hand blender which I used here and, I believe, made the recipe infinitely easier.


  9. black bean soup

    January 14, 2013 by Angie

    We’ve been so busy with packing for our big move to our very first house! We’re renting, not buying, but it’s still a big deal because neither of us have lived in any house other than our parents’. Knowing we’d be hungry and covered in dust and other dormant apartment nastiness from packing, I made this black bean soup yesterday morning and kept it cooking in the slow cooker all day so we could enjoy it for dinner last night.

    Black Bean Soup

    I followed a recipe from my favorite slow cooker book, Fresh from the Vegetarian Slow Cooker by Robin Robertson. If you like soup, I definitely recommend this cookbook. I got to use my fabulous immersion blender for this recipe. Here’s a photo of the cooked soup before blending.

    before pureeing

    And here’s one after blending about half of the chunky ingredients to make a thicker soup. So good! A+ leftovers too.

    after pureeing


  10. “Chloe’s Kitchen” Cookbook Review

    December 12, 2012 by Angie

    Book: Chloe’s Kitchen: 125 Easy, Delicious Recipes for Making the Food You Love the Vegan Way
    Author: Chloe Coscarelli
    Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    I recently checked out Chloe Coscarelli’s new book Chloe’s Kitchen: 125 Easy, Delicious Recipes for Making the Food You Love the Vegan Way from my public library. I’m a fan of her blog and heard good things about this cookbook so I dove in and made several recipes over two weeks. Here’s a rundown of the recipes I tested.

    Penne alla Vodka with the Best Garlic Bread in the World: This was my favorite. I made the garlic bread twice – once for our omnivorous friends to go with a stew I made. Everybody loved it. The Penne alla Vodka was so good too. I made it with Dreamfields penne for fewer carbs. The sauce was excellent and was possibly even better the next day. It’s fast so it could be a weeknight meal. Using the hand blender to blend the cashews and water together made it really easy and the cleanup was pretty painless that way too.

    The Christmas Kitty salt shaker presides over the delicious garlic bread.

    Mongolian BBQ Seitan: This one was kind of a miss. It wasn’t bad but I wouldn’t make the seitan part again. The sauce was good although I’d made something very similar on my own before out of ingredients in my fridge so it was nothing revolutionary. Her seitan recipe from the back of the book wasn’t great. I had never made seitan before but I followed the directions perfectly. The only thing that might be user error is how I sliced it. I tried to slice it thin but it was still kinda chunky. If I had used a vegetable peeler to shave the seitan that might have resulted in a better texture. It was on the rubbery side but it also didn’t taste like much even though it cooked in a tasty soy sauce/vegetable broth for over an hour.

    Tomato-Basil Bisque: Robbie said it was the best tomato soup he’s ever had and he’s a tomato soup connoisseur. I have to agree with him. I’m kinda picky about tomato soup and sometimes find it a bit gross but this one was excellent. The recipe is easy – roughly chop the vegetables, roast them, then combine everything in a stock pot and use the hand blender to get it to the right, smooth consistency. I think this would be a much bigger hassle if you had to pour it in batches into a blender as the recipe suggests. Hand blender is the way to go!

    Fettuccine Alfredo: Another very easy weeknight recipe. I sauteed some zucchini, yellow squash, broccoli, baby carrots, and cauliflower in vegan margarine to go with it. I also used Dreamfields linguine instead of real fettuccine to make it healthier/low carb. It’s creamy and delicious like real Fettuccine Alfredo but I didn’t feel like I needed to take cholesterol medication after I ate it. I have leftovers I’m looking forward to for lunch.

    Best-Ever Baked Macaroni and Cheese: I made the stovetop version of this recipe from her blog. It’s identical up until the point where you sprinkle with breadcrumbs and bake it. It’s fast and tasty but definitely not my favorite vegan macaroni and cheese recipe.

    I’ve made and enjoyed at least two other recipes from her blog in the past, as well: panang curry and chocolate chip cookie dough truffles. It’s no doubt she has some great ones.

    Overall, I give the book four out of five stars. I deducted a star mostly because it’s light on the photos. There are no photos at all of several of the recipes which is kinda lame, in my opinion. I read a lot of blogs and love that I can see photos of every finished dish and often step by step photos for the recipes I make. She clearly hired a food photographer for this book and has included several photos of herself so I don’t see why there can’t be at least one color photo for each recipe. We need to know how the finished product is supposed to look! Also, the index is not great.

    Everything I tried was a great success except for the Mongolian BBQ Seitan. Now that I’m the proud owner of a bag of vital wheat gluten, I’ll be trying out other seitan recipes and would happily use her Mongolian BBQ sauce/stir fry idea to go with it once I find one we like. She explains everything clearly so it’s not difficult to follow the directions and get the same results in your kitchen. She also uses fairly “normal” ingredients that I’m able to get at my grocery store. The only thing she called for that I’ve never seen before is canned lentils. Only dried lentils ’round these parts. Another thing I like is how she names her recipes so arrogantly – “Best-Ever Baked Macaroni and Cheese” and “Best Garlic Bread in the World”. She’s the cocky rapper of vegan chefs.